Webinar Pricing Data

BY Jeff Cobb


It’s been a while since we published the webinar pricing data on this page, but we have found over time that it is still pretty well in line with what we see among organizations that charge for their Webinars. The data comes from a survey we conducted on the marketing of Webinars (whether as an educational product or as promotional/lead generation tool).

Here are the questions we asked of organizations that actually sell Webinars:

Highest Webinar Pricing

Question: What is the highest amount (in U.S. dollars) your organization charges for a Webinar? Please enter a whole number–no commas, decimals, or dollar signs.

Average (out of 62 responses): $199

Question: What is the typical length (in minutes) of one of the Webinars for which your organization charges this highest amount? (For example, enter 60 for a one-hour Webinar.) Please enter a whole number–no commas or decimals.

Average (out of 62 responses): 87.5 minutes

This works out to approximately $2.27 per minute. So, at the high end, a one hour Webinar would run around $136.

***

Lowest Webinar Pricing

Question: Excluding any free Webinars you may offer what is the lowest amount (in U.S. dollars) your organization charges for a Webinar? Please enter a whole number–no commas, decimals, or dollar signs.

Average (out of 61 responses): $76

Question: What is the typical length (in minutes) of one of the Webinars for which your organization charges this lowest amount? (For example, enter 60 for a one-hour Webinar.) Please enter a whole number–no commas or decimals.

Average (out of 61 responses): 73 minutes

This works out to approximately $1.04 per minute. So, on the low end, a one hour Webinar would run about $62

This is a relatively small sample, but these figures might nonetheless be of some help if you are in the midst of figuring out your Webinar price points.

I’ll emphasize in closing, though, that I never advocate setting prices based purely on what the market trends are. These are simply a point of reference. They tell you something about what market expectations may be, but your overall product strategy should focus on how you differentiate your product – and, by extension, your price – from the market. If you want to explore pricing in greater depth, I recommend the following posts:

  • Pricing Online Learning (Article | Blog Post)
    A discussion of some of the fundamental principles of pricing as they apply to sales of e-learning products and services.

Finally, I’ll note my strong bias that Webinars – at least when they are called “Webinars” – are best used for content marketing, and as a result, best offered for free. If you want to sell it, don’t call it a Webinar.

Jeff

  1. BRad Poquette says:

    CAn you share what industries were surveyed? We do webinars for nurses and wonder if they answered with lesser costing, thanks

    Brad

    1. Jeff Cobb says:

      Brad – We did not drill down very deeply on an industry level on this one – mainly distinguished between nonprofit, for profit, etc. I can tell you from past surveys in the association market, however, that for online educational content in general, the non-physician healthcare market (which is as close as we have gotten to narrowing down to nurses) charged about 20% below the average and about 40% below the median across all industries. – Jeff

  2. Jeff, approximately how many survey respondents were there? You referred to a small sample but I’m not sure what that means. Thank you! Anita

  3. Sorry, I see it is around 62 respondents. Thank you! Anita

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